Playstation 4 in Google Analytics

Neither Google Analytics nor Adobe Reports & Analytics recognizes Playstation 4 as a device, operating system or browser.

In Google Analytics you can create a custom segment with the following constraints to only show visits from PS4s:

Operating System: contains “(not set)”
Browser: contains “Mozilla Compatible Agent”
Browser Version: contains “5.0”
Screen Resolution: contains “1920x1080”

How to solve this in Adobe Reports & Analytics is left as an exercise for the reader, because I can’t freaking figure it out. 

How to enable search in the IBM Lotus Notes (iNotes) webmail interface

This may seem obvious, but I looked for this for months before finding it by coincidence. If you are stuck using Lotus Notes you are probably not surprised by someone having a hard time doing anything at all in this convoluted nightmare of a system.

Anyway, to enable full-text email search:

  1. Click Preferences in the top right menu
  2. In the Basics section, under Search, check the box saying Enable full-text indexing for searching
  3. Done! You now have a search field in the top right corner of the middle frame when you a mailbox tab is active.

I know it’s scary, but to sell is your job too

Many designers, me especially, have an unfounded fear of selling. We’re solvers of problem and creators of solutions, our thinking goes. We’re not sleazy salesmen trying to wring money from unwanting people. Our designs are work of truth and beauty and should practically sell themselves.

Ok, I’m not really that naïve, but it’s not that far off base.

The solution might be a change of mindset. To not see selling as pushing crap onto unwilling customers, but instead think of it as helping people finding solutions to their pains and problems.

Design does not start with being handed a defined problem, but somehow I’ve always thought of finding a troubled client as “not my job”. Even after realizing that design is not just a craft – it’s also business – I’ve always thought myself too junior to try to sell our services. Or too timid. Or simply too afraid.

Afraid I’ll do it wrong. Afraid I’ll come across as a slick used car salesman type. Afraid I’ll just scare the clients away.

Anyhow, to help me and other sell-o-phobics, I’ve found two helpful books!

Spin Selling by Neil Rackham – Disregard the “selly” name and the horrid cover. It’s a great book, based in extensive research. It discusses the difference between what’s effective in small sales (used cars, magazine subscriptions and other things that most of the time can be sold with just one conversation) and major sales (website redesigns, fleets of trucks, apartments and other sales where seller probably won’t be present when the final decision to buy is made). It also makes it clear why traditional pushy selling, focused on “closing”, does not work when selling design. Most of all this book really helped me see selling in terms of solving a need.

Spin Selling is available as a hardback on Amazon, but I would recommend the abridged audio book available at Audible.* I’ve listened to it twice. The narrator is a bit overenthusiastic, but you get 3 hour of interesting listening. Some parts are a bit repetitive, but the plentiful nuggets make up for that. If you aren’t already a Audible customer you can get the book for free with your free 30-day trial.

Design is a Job by Mike Monteiro – Actually, I’ve known about this book since it was published, but only took the time to read it recently. I should have done it earlier! It’s a short & sweet read, and Mike is a great writer. The book is full of no-nonsense advice, not only covering selling in the sense of getting clients, but also points out the importance of selling, not just presenting, your design. Mikes source of knowledge is decades of mistakes made working in design, and he’s not afraid to share.

Working in User Experience empathy with the users of our designs is second nature to us, but Mike reminds us of the equally important empathy with our clients. Clients are not the enemy. Bad design is.

The best thing? The chapter most relevant to this discussion, Getting clients, is actually available for free online! I do recommend you to buy the whole thing though.

So, did the books help? Sure, I’m no longer pathologically scared of the concept of selling, just nervous about the actual activity. Roleplaying selling our design services with my colleagues while drinking beer after work sure helped with that though. :)

* I’m an Amazon and Audible affiliate. If you buy Spin Selling using one of my links, I might get a buck or two.

After having severe troubles finding the international Kindle models on Amazon.com I created a website that lists all Amazon Kindle models that you can buy internationally.
I actually coded a monstrous template-based static page generator in Python that generates a page for every major language in every country where you can order the global Kindle models. This helps people searching for things like “Amazon Kindle Hrvatska” as well as “Buy Kindle in Hungary”.
All the different country names in all the different languages are listed in this sitemap.
The design is fairly responsive, and I’ve had a blast doing some actual coding for the first time in a while.

After having severe troubles finding the international Kindle models on Amazon.com I created a website that lists all Amazon Kindle models that you can buy internationally.

I actually coded a monstrous template-based static page generator in Python that generates a page for every major language in every country where you can order the global Kindle models. This helps people searching for things like “Amazon Kindle Hrvatska” as well as “Buy Kindle in Hungary”.

All the different country names in all the different languages are listed in this sitemap.

The design is fairly responsive, and I’ve had a blast doing some actual coding for the first time in a while.